ataraxia

daddiesdatebabies:

"Our Sugar Daddy Left Us"

Anna Lakomy, a talented actress, reached out to Daddies Date Babies. Among other upcoming collaborations (stay tuned!), she sent me this awesome video of the social experiment she did a few years ago to “shed light on growing tuition rates and struggling economy which are oftentimes impetus for young people to enter ‘mutually beneficial arrangements.’”

Fascinating stuff!

nevver:

Black and sinister tasks, acts of desperate courage; moribund nightmare. Le Corbusier

it’s okay ❤

nevver:

Black and sinister tasks, acts of desperate courage; moribund nightmare.
Le Corbusier

it’s okay ❤

sonjabarbaric:

John Wesley, The Liar


it’s okay ❤

sonjabarbaric:

John Wesley, The Liar

it’s okay ❤

nevver:

Honey do,  Natalie Fressell

It’s okay ❤

nevver:

Honey do, Natalie Fressell

It’s okay ❤

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daddiesdatebabies:

Parinda (the producer) and Tess (a subject from the documentary) are chillin like villains and we’re taking questions! Anything y’all want to know? We’ll either answer here or in the doc itself. 

Tess the blonde chick from the doc here—hit me with your best shots!

Daddies Date Babies | a documentary

daddiesdatebabies:

Our Kickstarter is live! We have 28 days left to raise the funds to make this documentary happen— and what better use of some of that sugar you’re getting than to help other girls like us tell their stories? 

And don’t forget to tell all your friends! :) 

down to 25 days now!

I’m the blonde chick in this documentary. If you like what you see, please consider donating and reblogging. If you don’t… reblog and talk about it ;)

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monosexuals:

What he says: how do u know when lesbian sex is over???

What he means: I’ve never given a woman an orgasm ever in my life

❤

Quelques choses qui me font penser à le rénard.

Quelques choses qui me font penser à le rénard.

"

[after a half-hearted suicide attempt at age 13]

When Daddy comes in, he carries you to bed. Is there anything you feel like you could eat, Pokey? Anything at all?

All you can imagine putting in your mouth is a cold plum, one with really tight skin on the outside but gum-shocking sweetness inside. And he and your mother discuss where he might find some this late in the season. Mother says hell I don’t know. Further north, I’d guess.

The next morning, you wake up in your bed and sit up. Mother says, Pete, I think she’s up. He hollers in, You ready for breakfast, Pokey. Then he comes in grinning, still in his work clothes from the night before. He’s holding a farm bushel. The plums he empties onto the bed river toward you through folds in the quilt. If you stacked them up, they’d fill the deepest bin at the Piggly Wiggly.

Damned if I didn’t get the urge to drive to Arkansas last night, he says.

Your mother stands behind him saying he’s pure USDA crazy.

Fort Smith, Arkansas. Found a roadside stand out there with a feller selling plums. And I says, Buddy, I got a little girl sick back in Texas. She’s got a hanker for plums and ain’t nothing else gonna do.

It’s when you sink your teeth into the plum that you make a promise. The skin is still warm from riding in the sun in Daddy’s truck, and the nectar runs down your chin.

And you snap out of it. Or are snapped out of it. Never again will you lay a hand against yourself, not so long as there are plums to eat and somebody-anybody-who gives enough of a damn to haul them to you. So long as you bear the least nibblet of love for any other creature in this dark world, though in love portions are never stingy. There are no smidgens or pinches, only rolling abundance. That’s how you acquire the resolution for survival that the coming years are about to demand. You don’t earn it. It’s given.

"

- Mary Karr, Cherry 

septembriseur:

As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from her heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice. (x)

I can’t help thinking also that such a major theme of this movie is secrecy: how dangerous it is to do things in the dark, because if you don’t have to confess to what you’re doing, you never really have to own it. You don’t have to own your acts, or the consequences of your acts. No one can hold you responsible. In Natasha’s case, shining a light into the dark exposes both the secret things that she’s done and the secret things that have been done to her— most of which are intimately connected. To expose herself means exposing herself both as perpetrator and victim, not only as someone who has done terrible things, but also as someone who has been vulnerable in terrible ways. For Natasha, that is a very major sacrifice. But at the same time, it’s an act of strength: a statement that she is strong enough, and enough at peace, to own herself, to contain her history. 

That, to me, is an arc of the movie that’s almost unspoken: from Natasha’s devotion to Fury, which hints at a past in which he has helped her grow towards that peace, to her interactions with Steve, which seem like a kind of self-test: if this person, this fundamentally decent and loving person, can trust her, then maybe…? And this is the climax of that arc, the point at which she herself has to judge whether she is someone who can be seen without shame. Someone who can stand up under that scrutiny. And she does. And that takes unbelievable courage.